Grading Format and Guidelines

AP® STUDIO ART SCORING GUIDELINES 

 Usethis to assess your work.  Explain yourdecisions.  USE YOUR OWN PAPER TOWRITE ABOUT YOUR ART.  Remember to putyour name on it and on the reverse of your artwork.

General information and a few provisos:
• The scoring guidelines for the AP portfolios contains score points from 6(excellent) through 5 (strong),
4 (good), 3 (moderate), 2 (weak), and 1 (poor).
• Each score point is characterized by a variety of descriptors of work thatwould receive that score.
• Because there are only six different points on the scale, each score pointrepresents a band or range of
accomplishment.
• Some of the descriptors may seem to contradict each other because the rangeof possibilities for work at a
given score point is so great.
• The descriptors are examples; it is not expected that all the descriptors fora scale point will apply to any
one particular portfolio.
• The descriptors intentionally discuss general aspects of artwork at eachscore point; there is no preferred
(or unacceptable) content or style.
• The descriptors (taken as a whole) capture characteristics of work thatmerits each score.
• This is a living document—one that evolves over time. Though these are thescoring
guidelines that were used in 2008, they are always open to subsequent revision.

Concepts and skills include but are not limited to:

• Light and Shade                                

• Rendering of Form

• Composition

• Surface Manipulation

• The Illusion of Depth

• Mark-making, thinking/effort/ingenuity

6 EXCELLENT QUALITY.Work at this level: (100)

• is generally ofexcellent quality, although not all pieces will necessarily be at precisely thesame level of
expertise;
• demonstrates an excellent understanding of drawing through composition,concept, and execution;
• shows obvious evidence of thinking and/or informed decision-making;
• addresses fairly complex visual and/or conceptual ideas;
• shows an imaginative, inventive, and confident use of the elements andprinciples of design to
demonstrate drawing skills;
• uses materials effectively; technique is generally excellent;
• may show successful engagement with experimentation and/or risk-taking;
• may be notable for sensitivity and/or subtlety.
• Any use of digital or photographic processes shows excellent understanding ofdrawing concepts and
skills.
• Any apparent use of published or photographic sources or the work of otherartists clearly provides a
visual reference in the service of a larger, personal vision.

 

5 STRONG QUALITY. Work at this level: (95)

• is generally strong,although there may be inconsistencies in overall quality;
• demonstrates a strong understanding of drawing through composition, visualconcepts, and execution;
• has a strong sense of purpose or direction;
• shows evidence of thinking;
• shows evidence of confidence;
• may have evocative qualities;
• successfully engages with most aspects of technique and materials;
• shows a strong grasp of the elements and principles of design, using them todemonstrate drawing skills.
• Any use of digital or photographic processes shows strong understanding ofdrawing concepts and skills.
• Any apparent use of published or photographic sources or the work of otherartists shows a strong sense
of the student’s individual transformation of the images.

4 GOOD QUALITY. Work at this level:(90)

• is generally of goodquality, although there may be inconsistencies in overall quality;
• demonstrates a good understanding of drawing through composition, concepts,and execution;
• has a sense of purpose or direction, but it is not fully resolved;
• has some technical aspects that are handled well or some ideas that arehandled well, but the two do not
always mesh and work together;
• uses the elements and principles of design to demonstrate drawing skills.
• Any use of digital or photographic processes demonstrates good understandingof drawing concepts and
skills.
• If there is apparent use of published or photographic sources or the work ofother artists, the student’s
individual “voice” can be discerned.

3 MODERATE QUALITY. Work at this level: (85)

• is generally ofmoderate quality, although there may be inconsistencies in overall quality;
• demonstrates a moderate understanding of drawing through composition, concepts,and execution;
• shows a sense of real effort but does not demonstrate purpose or direction;
• shows good technical skills but is weak in terms of ideas;
• addresses ideas, but the technical skills needed to resolve them are weak;
• shows an emerging understanding of the elements and principles of design todemonstrate drawing
skills;
• has erratic technique, with little or no sense of challenge.
• Any use of digital or photographic processes shows moderate understanding ofdrawing concepts and
skills.
• If published photographic sources or the work of other artists are used, thework appears to be a nearly
direct reproduction; the student’s “voice” is minimal.

 

 

2 WEAK QUALITY. Work at this level: (80)

• is generally awkward;
• solves problems simplistically;
• has little sense of exploration;
• lacks a clear sense of intention;
• shows little understanding of elements and principles of design; compositionis weak;
• shows limited artistic decision-making.
• Any use of digital or photographic processes shows minimal understanding ofdrawing concepts and
skills.
• The works are copies of published or photographic sources or the work ofother artists; there is little
discernible student “voice.”

1 POOR QUALITY. Work at this level: (75)

•is generally inept;
• shows little evidence of thinking/artistic decision-making;
• reveals a lack of understanding of technique;
• shows a lack of awareness of tools/media;
• uses trite solutions to visual problems;
• is poorly composed, with minimal consideration given to elements andprinciples of design.
• Any use of digital or photographic processes shows a lack of understanding ofdrawing concepts and
skills.
• The works are obviously direct copies of photographic sources or the work ofother artists; there is no
discernible student “voice.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©2008 The College Board. All rights reserved.


No Items Available